Patient Resources

This section of our website contains a variety of information for patients who are using Equimed’s remote patient monitoring service for implantable cardiac devices (pacemakers, defibrillators (ICDs), implantable loop recorders (ILRs), intracardiac monitors (CRT-D or CRT-P including heart failure monitoring). If you are looking for vendor specific information about your device, please click on one of the the manufacturers’ boxes below.

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Frequently Asked Questions

On average, a pacemaker or defibrillator can last 5 to 7 years or longer. Depending on how often the device is being used and its programmed settings can significantly alter the life of the device.
Remote cardiac monitoring for patients with defibrillators or pacemakers is the process by which an implanted cardiac device actively sends data through a wireless or wired transmitter to the device manufacturer’s secure website where it is reviewed and interpreted by a qualified medical professional.
Most devices that are implanted today have the ability to remotely transmit through a wireless device that is given to the patient at the time of implant. It normally stays in the patient’s home and can acquire data about the device and the patient’s heart function on a routine basis.
Most devices implanted today are considered “remote monitoring capable”. That means that you will be given an external transmitter that will actively talk to your implanted device. This allows specific device and heart related information to be uploaded to your physician for review. In most cases, this allows the patient to stay home and not have to travel to their medical facility for their device to be checked. If you want to find out if your device is capable of remote monitoring, check with your healthcare professional.
A. Yes. The FDA recommends that the patient's cell phone is stored away from the pacemaker implant site. For example, it should not be placed in a shirt pocket that is located on the chest. It is also recommended that the cell phone is placed on the ear opposite of the pacemaker location while in use. For additional information, please check with your healthcare provider.
Patients with congestive heart failure may be implanted with a special type of device called a CRT (cardiac resynchronization therapy). This type of device has electrical leads that are placed in both of the bottom chambers of the heart and help the heart to beat more efficiently. These devices may function as either a pacemaker (CRT-P) or a defibrillator (CRT-D). For additional information about implantable CRT devices, please check with your healthcare professional.
An implantable loop recorder is a small, electronic device that is implanted under the skin of your chest and monitors and records the electrical activity of your heart. They are often prescribed to help diagnose abnormal heart rhythms that result in such symptoms as palpitations, chest pain or syncope (passing out.)
An implantable loop recorder, or ILR, is a small device that is implanted under the skin in your chest. It monitors and records the electrical activity of your heart. After implant, you may have a few stitches at the implant site and may have some general area soreness for a few days afterwards. If you are experiencing severe or continued pain, please contact your healthcare professional immediately.
Once the initial implant of a loop recorder is completed, most patients comment that they forget that it is there. Depending on the anatomical placement of the device, you may be able to feel it under your skin. Loop recorders vary in size with many the size of a small flash drive or pencil.
A. The implanting of a loop recorder can vary based on the type of device, the anatomy of the patient and the type of medical facility that is being used. The actual procedure can be done in 10-15 minutes. Check with your healthcare professional with any questions about the implant procedure.
Yes. Medicare will pay for the remote monitoring of a loop recorder including both the active monitoring and physician interpretation components. For additional information about your coverage and copays, please contact your insurance carrier.
In most cases, an implantable loop recorder (ILR) is monitored remotely. The implanted device wirelessly sends data about your heart’s electrical activity to a transmitter that is located in your home or facility. This data is then uploaded to the device manufacturer’s secure website and reviewed by a qualified medical professional. If you don’t have a wireless transmitter, ask your physician if this is an option for your device.
A. After your pacemaker is implanted, it will begin monitoring your heart rhythms and provide a small electrical stimulus to your heart when needed. Some patients will notice the difference between their normal heartbeat and when their pacemaker is working. Most patients report that they have more energy and feel better after a pacemaker is put in. If you have additional questions about how your pacemaker works, please contact your healthcare professional.